Cumulative Book Index, 1931 #1

Subtitle: A World List of Books in the English Language, Vol XXXIV, May 1931, Number 5. To be used with April Number (Compiled to April 22nd).

I’m not entirely sure how this works, but it seems to be a list of books published in 1930 and 1931 of which the publishers of this guide have been notified. There is a brief list at the start of Recent English Publications issued in countries other than Great Britain, Canada and the United States – Australia, China, France, Germany, India (the largest section), Italy, Jamaica, Netherlands, South Africa and Switzerland. The publishers of the guide seem to be American. Books are listed several times, by author, title and subject.

Here is the first batch of books I have noted:

Advanced problems of the fiction writer. Gallishaw, John. (On Archive.Org.)

American history in masque and wig. Price, O. This seems to have been a book of plays for schools by Olive Price.

Around the world with a tired business man. Thompson, R. There’s a short extract from the book in this theatre programme (PDF, page 13), where the author is describing his examination of a Chinese woman’s bound feet. It’s not a particularly pleasant example of Orientalism and male abuse of power.

Compulsory repatriation of prostitutes (Association for moral and social hygiene). This was the English association. there was evidently a lot of discussion at the time about whether foreign women working as prostitutes should be expelled from the country. This League of Nations report from 1932 covers some of the debate. See page 3: “the great majority of women’s international associations had declared themselves opposed to the expulsion of foreign prostitutes, [and] had made strenuous efforts to obtain the ratification of the 1923 Convention for the Suppression of Obscene Publications, [and] were everywhere urging that licensed houses should be closed, and were taking steps to induce Governments to introduce women police where such did not as yet exist”. Where “necessitous women and girls” are repatriated, women’s associations want better support to be in place after repatriation.

Autobiography of an engineer. Emmet, W. There is a short biography of him by Willis Whitney from 1942.

Bachelor girls. Starr, Richard. Haven’t been able to find anything online about him. There is a copy on eBay for £98.

Back to your knitting. Goodman, Jules. This was apparently a one-act “mystery farce”.

Animosities: with drawings by the author. Bacon, Peggy. Wikipedia describes her as a “printmaker, illustrator, painter and writer … known for her humorous and ironic etchings and drawings”.

Old songs and balladry for girl scouts. Edgar, M. Marjorie Edgar was a folk song collector: some details here. Probably needs a Wiki article.

House desirable: a handbook for those who wish to acquire homes that charm. Barron, PA. Can’t find anything about this one.

Draw animals! Best Maurgard, Adolfo. Wikipedia.

Journey in England. Binder, Frank. This has been republished recently and looks interesting. There’s an article about Binder here. I like his daughter’s comment: “He’d be pleased that the novel had finally been published, but he’d probably criticise the way it’s been edited.” There are some extracts from A Journey in England here.

Training the emotions, controlling fear (Boston School Committee). Nothing online about this.

President’s daughter. Britton, Nan. Wikipedia (article needs work and referencing). This is a non-fiction book about the relationship the author had with American president Warren Harding, with whom she had a daughter.

Polly’s shop. Brown, Edna Adelaide. This is on Archive.org and looks interesting. There is a brief biography here. Also probably needs a wiki article.

One of the weird things – which probably shouldn’t be weird – is reading through it and there being lots of authors one doesn’t know, and then coming upon someone one does, like Sayers or Buchan (John, not his sister) or Jowett.

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